Closed

Select your country

We have a special shop for your country. If you would like to shop there, please click on the box for {geo-overlay-switch-to} below.


Confirm
  • My Account
  • Kontakt
  • Stores
  • Warenkorb

Der Warenkorb ist leer.

Der Artikel wurde erfolgreich zu Ihrer Wunschliste hinzugefügt. Melden Sie sich mit Ihrem Kundenkonto an, um diese dauerhaft zu speichern.

Wunschliste anzeigen

Leider ist ein technischer Fehler aufgetreten.

Größentabelle

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Brust
    (cm)
    74
    bis
    77
    78
    bis
    81
    82
    bis
    85
    86
    bis
    89
    90
    bis
    93
    94
    bis
    97
    Taille
    (cm)
    59
    bis
    62
    63
    bis
    66
    67
    bis
    70
    71
    bis
    74
    75
    bis
    78
    79
    bis
    82
    Hüfte
    (cm)
    83
    bis
    86
    87
    bis
    90
    91
    bis
    94
    95
    bis
    98
    99
    bis
    102
    103
    bis
    107
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Brust
    (cm)
    86
    bis
    89
    90
    bis
    93
    94
    bis
    97
    98
    bis
    101
    102
    bis
    105
    106
    bis
    109
    Taille
    (cm)
    73
    bis
    76
    77
    bis
    80
    81
    bis
    84
    85
    bis
    88
    89
    bis
    92
    93
    bis
    96
    Hüfte
    (cm)
    87
    bis
    90
    91
    bis
    94
    95
    bis
    98
    99
    bis
    102
    103
    bis
    106
    107
    bis
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Circa Werte)

Closed – Rick Zabel
CLOSED – Since 1978
Closed – Rick Zabel
CLOSED – Since 1978 CLOSED – Since 1978
Closed – Rick Zabel
Closed – Rick Zabel
Rick Zabel has been a professional cyclist for the past twelve years and a member of Team Israel Start-Up Nation since 2020. The 27-year-old Cologne-based pro also has a busy family life and hosts his own podcast, called “Plan Z”. We chatted with him and found out how he achieves a work-life balance as an athlete with (almost) daily training sessions. He talks about his good luck charms – and tells us about his other roles as a father and a son.
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

Rick Zabel has lived in Cologne for a good two and a half years – and felt really at home since day one. What he likes best: the cheerful people and the beautiful surroundings, perfect for cycling.

CLOSED – Since 1978

Rick Zabel has lived in Cologne for a good two and a half years – and felt really at home since day one. What he likes best: the cheerful people and the beautiful surroundings, perfect for cycling.

Rick Zabel has lived in Cologne for a good two and a half years – and felt really at home since day one. What he likes best: the cheerful people and the beautiful surroundings, perfect for cycling.

CLOSED – Since 1978

Rick Zabel usually trains alone, but still considers himself part of a team. Most of his 30 teammates from Israel Start-Up Station live elsewhere. There are training camps for the whole team throughout the year, mostly in Spain or France.

CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

Rick Zabel usually trains alone, but still considers himself part of a team. Most of his 30 teammates from Israel Start-Up Station live elsewhere. There are training camps for the whole team throughout the year, mostly in Spain or France.

What does your typical day look like?
After breakfast, I try to get on my bike as fast as I can. We probably all know that it’s best not to put off your workout. My daily session is determined by my training plan. On rest days I either don’t cycle at all or I do an hour of easy cycling; on other days, I do between three and six hours. A three-hour cycle is more intense, faster or with intervals. Six hours means a long tour and basic endurance training. When I come home from training, my job is done. Of course, I always have to keep a close eye on nutrition and my sleep rhythm. What’s really important for me is to tick off the cycling part of the day when I’ve parked the bike in the basement. I’m not a couch potato and I usually try to go out and do stuff afterwards.
It sounds like achieving a good work-life balance is important for you…
Most definitely. I’m an outgoing person. My balance is being in the city, spending time with my family, drinking coffee, meeting friends, doing my podcast. That’s what I need to free my mind from the training sessions and constant analysis. Some pros believe in concentrating exclusively on cycling and not doing much else besides lying on the couch, keeping their legs still and counting calories. For me, that would be like being in prison. I am a human being, not a robot.
How has your day-to-day life changed since you became a father last year?
The biggest change is not having as much time for yourself. Becoming a father really planted me in the here and now. When I spend time with my son, I devote myself entirely to the moment. My working day hasn’t changed, but when I come home, I am a father first and foremost.
Do you cycle for fun in your free time?
Yes, that is really important for me. There are days when I just get on my bike to feel the sensation of cycling, to feel the wind and the sun on my skin, mostly on my rest days. In moments like these, I don’t care how fast I’m going – I just ride to have fun. Often, I take a friend with me, and we go for a casual ride together, chat or shoot footage with the GoPro.
You have followed in the career footsteps of both your father, Erik Zabel, and your grandfather, Detlef Zabel. Did you know from an early age that you would become a cyclist?
It wasn’t clear from the very beginning, although in retrospect you might think it was. My grandfather was a professional, my dad was a professional and my mother’s brother and father also raced. My father, in particular, was very successful. As a child, I was always there – but more as a fan. I played football for a few years until I decided it wasn’t for me. When I was 12 or 13, I tried cycling and stuck with it because I enjoyed it and liked the community. A little later I realised I had talent – and when you succeed at something, it’s even more fun. That is how I came to cycling, although of course you can’t deny the family influence. From time to time, I do question this choice: why did I become a professional cyclist? What else would have suited me? Particularly since I have become a father myself. I’d love for my son to choose something completely different – perhaps in the creative field.

Swipe to continue reading

What does your typical day look like?
After breakfast, I try to get on my bike as fast as I can. We probably all know that it’s best not to put off your workout. My daily session is determined by my training plan. On rest days I either don’t cycle at all or I do an hour of easy cycling; on other days, I do between three and six hours. A three-hour cycle is more intense, faster or with intervals. Six hours means a long tour and basic endurance training. When I come home from training, my job is done. Of course, I always have to keep a close eye on nutrition and my sleep rhythm. What’s really important for me is to tick off the cycling part of the day when I’ve parked the bike in the basement. I’m not a couch potato and I usually try to go out and do stuff afterwards.
It sounds like achieving a good work-life balance is important for you…
Most definitely. I’m an outgoing person. My balance is being in the city, spending time with my family, drinking coffee, meeting friends, doing my podcast. That’s what I need to free my mind from the training sessions and constant analysis. Some pros believe in concentrating exclusively on cycling and not doing much else besides lying on the couch, keeping their legs still and counting calories. For me, that would be like being in prison. I am a human being, not a robot.
How has your day-to-day life changed since you became a father last year?
The biggest change is not having as much time for yourself. Becoming a father really planted me in the here and now. When I spend time with my son, I devote myself entirely to the moment. My working day hasn’t changed, but when I come home, I am a father first and foremost.
Do you cycle for fun in your free time?
Yes, that is really important for me. There are days when I just get on my bike to feel the sensation of cycling, to feel the wind and the sun on my skin, mostly on my rest days. In moments like these, I don’t care how fast I’m going – I just ride to have fun. Often, I take a friend with me, and we go for a casual ride together, chat or shoot footage with the GoPro.
You have followed in the career footsteps of both your father, Erik Zabel, and your grandfather, Detlef Zabel. Did you know from an early age that you would become a cyclist?
It wasn’t clear from the very beginning, although in retrospect you might think it was. My grandfather was a professional, my dad was a professional and my mother’s brother and father also raced. My father, in particular, was very successful. As a child, I was always there – but more as a fan. I played football for a few years until I decided it wasn’t for me. When I was 12 or 13, I tried cycling and stuck with it because I enjoyed it and liked the community. A little later I realised I had talent – and when you succeed at something, it’s even more fun. That is how I came to cycling, although of course you can’t deny the family influence. From time to time, I do question this choice: why did I become a professional cyclist? What else would have suited me? Particularly since I have become a father myself. I’d love for my son to choose something completely different – perhaps in the creative field.
CLOSED – SINCE 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

His favourite outfit is jeans, sneakers and a T-shirt or jumper – unless he’s wearing his team gear.

CLOSED – Since 1978

His favourite outfit is jeans, sneakers and a T-shirt or jumper – unless he’s wearing his team gear.

CLOSED – SINCE 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

His favourite outfit is jeans, sneakers and a T-shirt or jumper – unless he’s wearing his team gear.

CLOSED – Since 1978

His favourite outfit is jeans, sneakers and a T-shirt or jumper – unless he’s wearing his team gear.

CLOSED – SINCE 1978

New Cooper Tapered Jeans

  • Regular / 
  • Rustic Selvedge Denim / 
  • 13 oz.
275 CHF

New Stehkragenhemd aus Baumwollstoff

165 CHF

New T-Shirt aus Bio-Baumwolle mit Print

79 CHF

New Cooper Tapered Jeans

  • Regular / 
  • A BETTER BLUE / 
  • 13 oz.
239 CHF

New Denim Hoodie

209 CHF

New Pullover aus Schurwolle & Baumwolle

235 CHF

New Cooper Tapered Jeans

  • Regular / 
  • A BETTER BLUE / 
  • 13 oz.
225 CHF

New Poloshirt aus Baumwollpikee

189 CHF

New Weste aus recyceltem Nylon

269 CHF

New Colombo Wide Pants

  • Relaxed / 
  • Cotton Mix Fabric / 
  • Yarn Dyed
269 CHF

New Sweatshirtjacke aus Bio-Baumwolle

209 CHF

+1 Farbe

New Twill Jacket

385 CHF

New X-Lent Tapered Jeans

  • Relaxed / 
  • A BETTER BLUE / 
  • 13 oz.
225 CHF

New Atelier Jacket aus Baumwolle

269 CHF
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

In his podcast “Plan Z”, Rick Zabel talks to other cyclists – for example, Tanja Erath or his father Erik Zabel. He also loves listening to podcasts; during training, he’s usually either listening to podcasts or music.

CLOSED – Since 1978

In his podcast “Plan Z”, Rick Zabel talks to other cyclists – for example, Tanja Erath or his father Erik Zabel. He also loves listening to podcasts; during training, he’s usually either listening to podcasts or music.

CLOSED – Since 1978
Does the fact that your father was so successful put pressure on you?
It used to be like that. Back then, I really took it to heart when things didn’t go well. But at some point I realised: he had his career, I have my career. We are very different: he could be exceptionally focused and subordinate everything to the sport. That’s not me – if that's what it takes to become the best ever, I’d rather not do it and have a bit of fun instead.
What are the challenges of your job?
As a professional athlete you need incredible discipline, and maintaining that over many years can be challenging. The biggest challenge is that I’m on the road a lot and can’t see my family that often. I have four weeks off during the season – for the other eleven months I am an athlete. At Christmas or Easter, I always join the family after finishing my training. Sometimes I dream of having five days off, but if I don’t train for five days I know I’ll pay for it in the next race.
And what do you enjoy most?
love cycling with friends and being able to chat to each other. The community is great. For me, cycling is one of the most important transport methods for the future and I hope I can inspire more people to take it up. I ride 30,000 kilometres a year on an expensive bike, but that’s not what matters. If you enjoy cycling then we are members of the same community, even if you only cycle to and from work.
Are you superstitious, and do you have lucky charms or special rituals?
Not any more. When I was younger and more insecure, I was a big believer in rituals and superstition: if I put my left shoe on first then it’ll be a good day because that’s what I did before the last good race. That’s why I used to wear lots of wristbands. Now I am much more secure in my own character and my skills, and I know that it doesn’t make a difference which shoe you put on first. What happens on the bike is entirely up to me; I make the decisions, and not my wristband.
What is the greatest stroke of luck you have had so far?
The fact that I have been able to turn my passion into a career. That all my family are healthy (knock on wood) and my grandparents are still alive. That I met my wife and we became parents, which is truly amazing. I would describe my whole life as being blessed and lucky. It’s often a little bit surreal.

Swipe to continue reading

Does the fact that your father was so successful put pressure on you?
It used to be like that. Back then, I really took it to heart when things didn’t go well. But at some point I realised: he had his career, I have my career. We are very different: he could be exceptionally focused and subordinate everything to the sport. That’s not me – if that's what it takes to become the best ever, I’d rather not do it and have a bit of fun instead.
What are the challenges of your job?
As a professional athlete you need incredible discipline, and maintaining that over many years can be challenging. The biggest challenge is that I’m on the road a lot and can’t see my family that often. I have four weeks off during the season – for the other eleven months I am an athlete. At Christmas or Easter, I always join the family after finishing my training. Sometimes I dream of having five days off, but if I don’t train for five days I know I’ll pay for it in the next race.
And what do you enjoy most?
love cycling with friends and being able to chat to each other. The community is great. For me, cycling is one of the most important transport methods for the future and I hope I can inspire more people to take it up. I ride 30,000 kilometres a year on an expensive bike, but that’s not what matters. If you enjoy cycling then we are members of the same community, even if you only cycle to and from work.
Are you superstitious, and do you have lucky charms or special rituals?
Not any more. When I was younger and more insecure, I was a big believer in rituals and superstition: if I put my left shoe on first then it’ll be a good day because that’s what I did before the last good race. That’s why I used to wear lots of wristbands. Now I am much more secure in my own character and my skills, and I know that it doesn’t make a difference which shoe you put on first. What happens on the bike is entirely up to me; I make the decisions, and not my wristband.
What is the greatest stroke of luck you have had so far?
The fact that I have been able to turn my passion into a career. That all my family are healthy (knock on wood) and my grandparents are still alive. That I met my wife and we became parents, which is truly amazing. I would describe my whole life as being blessed and lucky. It’s often a little bit surreal.
CLOSED – Since 1978

BUMANN & SOHN

“It’s a super hip bar that becomes a club at the weekend and is constantly changing. Most of the things in it are handmade and there’s something to marvel at in every corner. In winter there’s even a little Christmas market.”
CLOSED – SINCE 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

BUMANN & SOHN

“It’s a super hip bar that becomes a club at the weekend and is constantly changing. Most of the things in it are handmade and there’s something to marvel at in every corner. In winter there’s even a little Christmas market.”
CLOSED – SINCE 1978
CLOSED – SINCE 1978
You can find our story about Rick Zabel in the new issue of our HARD COPY paper – On Superstition, Magic & More. It’s complimentary with every order in our online shop. Happy reading!
Back to top